Cbd hemp oil in eyes for dry eyes

Has anyone ever used CBD oil eye drops?

I have been told that thc or cbd in an opthamolic solution is really really hard to make. The people who I have heard use it said it hurt so bad. I would also be very wary of putting drops in my eye some cbd company made. If it was made by a pharmaceutical company and could guarantee purity, I would love to try them.

I personally take 500-600mg cbd oil suspended in macadamia nut oil. I buy the raw powder and suspend it in the oil myself. I basically do this every morning, weigh out my dose, heat the oil on the stove, drop the powder in, stir with silicon spatula till dissolved. then I pour it into my protein shake and drink. I genuinely believe the cbd has helped me a lot. It’s costing me 12.50USD a day, but I noticed after a couple weeks my inflammation was way better. The key is to take it every single day. i thought cbd was like Advil, I take it and it should immediately fix the inflammation. That was wrong. someone explained to me it’s like a supplement, you have to use it consistently for a while to get the effects.

let me also add, I still smoke pot too. When I asked my doc about it he’s like, you should keep doing that. I said regardless of the drying effect. he’s like eat it, lol. Great guy.

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  • Join Date: May 2018
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I’ve never heard of CBD eye drops. Let us know if you try it!

I have tried CBD hemp oil 20mg 1x/day capsules from a Vermont-based retailer for its supposed anti-inflammatory benefits. Tried it for a month, didn’t notice a difference. That was 6 months ago. Decided to try it again recently but 2x/day. So far it’s been two weeks with no obvious difference. Currently debating whether to order another bottle but I’m pretty skeptical, unless the price point goes down or there’s more evidence in the literature that this stuff works for dry eyes.

I’m thinking maybe if I use cbd oil to cook or as part of a meal it would be more appealing than just another supplement. Our body makes its own CBD naturally so I’m also not clear what a good dosage is. Dowork123, 500-600 mg sounds like a lot but the only frame of reference I have is the recommendation on the bottle I use from the Vermont retailer which recommends around 20-80 mg a day.

Comment

I’ve never heard of CBD eye drops. Let us know if you try it!

I have tried CBD hemp oil 20mg 1x/day capsules from a Vermont-based retailer for its supposed anti-inflammatory benefits. Tried it for a month, didn’t notice a difference. That was 6 months ago. Decided to try it again recently but 2x/day. So far it’s been two weeks with no obvious difference. Currently debating whether to order another bottle but I’m pretty skeptical, unless the price point goes down or there’s more evidence in the literature that this stuff works for dry eyes.

I’m thinking maybe if I use cbd oil to cook or as part of a meal it would be more appealing than just another supplement. Our body makes its own CBD naturally so I’m also not clear what a good dosage is. Dowork123, 500-600 mg sounds like a lot but the only frame of reference I have is the recommendation on the bottle I use from the Vermont retailer which recommends around 20-80 mg a day.

I was reading that for large amounts of inflammation, you need 300-500mg a day. I pay about 25 a gram

Also, one reason I never buy caps or tinctures is because you don’t know if they really dosed them correctly. I’ve seen so many edibles fail testing. they say 100mg on the package and tested at 12mg. I’ve had this happen to me A LOT. That’s why the only way I’d put cbd drops in my eye is if they were made following FDA regulations for sourcing the material. I also buy my cbd from Kentucky and Colorado because they have state run hemp programs which I trust more than some stoners growing some cbd plants and blasting them with butane or hexane.

CBD & the Eyes: Research & Can It Help You?

NVISION® content is medically reviewed by a licensed Ophthalmologist, Optometrist, Surgeon or Doctor. These vision experts ensure the content is fact-based and up-to-date.

We have strict sourcing guidelines and every page contains a full list of references for transparency.

CBD has become a touted treatment for various issues, including glaucoma. This is based on older medical studies and anecdotal reports that CBD oil, eye drops, and other forms of medical marijuana help to ease anxiety, eye strain, and eye pressure.

One of the first studies on medical marijuana for eye conditions involved glaucoma. This is a group of serious eye disorders associated with damage to the optic nerve, usually due to high fluid pressure in the eye, or intraocular pressure (IOP). This pressure must be lowered to prevent blindness. Further studies of medical marijuana have found that the drug does not actually lower pressure for long enough.

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The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CBD for some very limited medical uses, and several states have legalized both medical and recreational use of marijuana, both THC and CBD.

Dispensaries recommend CBD for eye treatment, especially glaucoma. Medical research has found that medical marijuana does not lower eye pressure for more than three or four hours, which is not long enough to prevent damage to the optic nerve. Paradoxically, it may increase the risk of damage due to fluctuations in eye pressure over the course of the day.

In fact, a recent medical study found that THC, not CBD, lowered eye pressure. By itself, CBD raises IOP, and in combination with THC, it can prevent THC from lowering IOP. THC is the intoxicating, recreational chemical in marijuana, which can be addictive and cause problems with thinking or memory.

It is important for you to follow medical advice from your optometrist and ophthalmologist to manage all eye conditions, from dry eyes to glaucoma. Don’t attempt to self-treat any eye issue with CBD.

Table of Contents

Cannabidiol (CBD) & Your Eyes: High Intraocular Pressure Is Dangerous

Glaucoma is a group of related eye conditions involving damage to the retina and optic nerve that leads to vision loss, typically due to high fluid pressure inside the eyes. Symptoms tend to start slowly until enough of the optic nerve is damaged that the person develops tunnel vision or another form of lost vision. Regular eye exams can help to diagnose glaucoma or high ocular pressure, so an optometrist or ophthalmologist can monitor this progression and ensure you receive appropriate treatment if you begin to lose your sight.

Treating glaucoma starts with medicated eye drops that are designed to lower intraocular pressure. If these do not work, there are several approaches to surgery that can lower fluid pressure in the eyes and prevent vision loss.

There are side effects to all these options, so many people with glaucoma, or who are at risk for glaucoma, want to find alternatives. One proposed alternative is CBD oil, or the cannabidiol molecule derived from medical marijuana.

Using Medical Marijuana Like CBD for Your Eyes Does Not Work

As marijuana has become more popular and many states have legalized both medical and recreational uses for this drug, CBD oil is being promoted for a range of uses, including as a glaucoma treatment.

There are very few medical studies on the effectiveness of CBD or medical marijuana, although the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information on potentially beneficial uses for this approach to treatment. They have approved one CBD-based drug for two types of severe, rare epilepsy. Some forms of medical marijuana have been examined to treat eye conditions, especially glaucoma, but newer research suggests that CBD is not an effective treatment for your eyes.

Medical marijuana has been touted to generally ease physical and emotional pain, including nausea related to cancer treatment, chronic pain, general anxiety disorder, and other conditions. In the 1970s and 1980s, medical marijuana was studied as an eye treatment, particularly for serious conditions like cataracts and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. The research found that marijuana could lower intraocular pressure for three or four hours at a time, and it was more effective at lowering pressure in the eyes than glaucoma drops.

However, the studies also found that these pressure-lowering effects would wear off after a certain amount of time, while the effects of glaucoma eye drop treatment lasted at least 12 hours. It is vital for eye health that treatment to manage intraocular pressure lasts for a long time and is consistent. When eye pressure rises and lowers several times throughout the day, damage to the optic nerve can get worse.

Medical Studies on CBD & the Eyes Suggests CBD Is a Dangerous Chemical

CBD in particular is receiving a lot of attention from the medical community and medical marijuana proponents. However, studies suggest that the CBD compound may make intraocular pressure higher, while THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the chemical in marijuana associated with substance abuse and getting high, is responsible for lowering eye pressure.

A study conducted in 2018 found that THC and CBD regulate eye pressure differently. When they are separated from marijuana, they will have radically different effects.

The results of the 2018 study found that a single dose of THC drops lowered IOP by 28 percent for 8 hours in male mice, although humans with glaucoma need 24-hour pressure relief to reduce damage to the optic nerve. The study also found two interesting problems. First, CBD inhibited THC from lowering IOP. Second, the effects of THC on eye pressure were sex-dependent, with male mice receiving noticeably greater benefit from the treatment.

  • Accelerated heartbeat, which can trigger anxiety or feel like anxiety.
  • Decreased blood pressure overall, which can be harmful to the cardiovascular system.
  • Reduced blood flow to several parts of the body, including the optic nerve, which can increase damage.
  • Increased risk of lung cancer specifically from smoking or vaping marijuana products.
  • Greater risk of addiction with any amount of marijuana treatment containing THC.
  • Drowsiness, memory loss, and cognitive issues associated with abusing marijuana.
  • Struggles to hold down a job or drive safely if drug-tested.
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Most medical research suggests that CBD does not intoxicate you the same way THC does, but taking types of medical marijuana marketed as “high CBD” might mean there are traces of THC included in the substance. THC is addictive because it can change brain chemistry to make you feel relaxed, less anxious, sleepy, or even happy. The drug can also cause negative side effects like changes in mood, spikes in anxiety or paranoia, delusions, and trouble thinking or problem-solving.

Follow Your Eye Doctor’s Treatment Plan for Treating Eye Conditions

Some dispensaries hype CBD for the eyes aside from glaucoma treatment, suggesting that it can ease pain from surgery, reduce dry eye, and even alleviate eye strain. However, there are no medical studies to back up these claims. The changes to eye pressure due to CBD may lead to damage to your vision, even if you do not have glaucoma.

The only currently approved medical approach for glaucoma is regular eye exams to monitor the condition. Follow your eye doctor’s advice to manage this condition if you are diagnosed with it. This will likely mean eye drops first to prevent vision loss. It could also mean laser eye surgery, drainage devices, or other types of surgery to alleviate intraocular pressure and reduce damage to the optic nerve.

References

Glaucoma. (July 2020). National Eye Institute (NEI).

Cannabidiol (CBD) – What We Know and What We Don’t. (August 2018). Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School.

Is There a Risk of Blindness With CBD? (2018). United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

CBD Oil May Worsen Glaucoma. (February 2019). American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO).

What Is Marijuana? (December 2019). National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

The information provided on this page should not be used in place of information provided by a doctor or specialist. To learn more, read our Privacy Policy and Editorial Policy pages.

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CBD Oil for Sjogren’s Syndrome [Is It Effective?]

Nowadays, many people see CBD as a miracle cure. It has become a popular remedy for pain, anxiety, seizure disorders, and more.

A quick online search suggests that CBD could even help chronic conditions like Sjogren’s syndrome. However, digging a little deeper reveals that there is little evidence to support many of these claims.

So, what is the truth about CBD oil for Sjogren’s syndrome? Is it really effective, or are companies just cashing in on the latest healthcare craze?

Here’s what you need to know.

What Is Sjogren’s Syndrome?

Sjogren’s syndrome affects somewhere between 0.1 and 4% of the population. It is a disorder that affects the glands that produce saliva and tears. The main symptoms of Sjogren’s syndrome are dry mouth and eyes, although it can cause other problems too.

The condition tends to develop between the ages of 40 and 60. It affects around ten times more women than men.

Sjogren’s Syndrome Symptoms

There is a wide variety of Sjogren’s syndrome symptoms, and they can range from mild to severe.

As a result of dry eyes, Sjogren’s syndrome can cause:

  • Burning, itching, or stinging
  • A gritty sensation in the eyes
  • Red or swollen eyelids
  • Sticky eyes on waking in the morning
  • Blurred vision
  • Sensitivity to light

Dry mouth can cause the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Altered sense of taste
  • Increased risk of dental problems

Furthermore, some (but not all) people with Sjogren’s syndrome also experience:

  • Dry, itchy skin
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Skin rashes (especially after sun exposure)

What Causes Sjogren’s Syndrome?

Sjogren’s syndrome is an autoimmune disorder, meaning the immune system becomes overactive and attacks healthy tissue. In the case of Sjogren’s syndrome, it damages the moisture-producing glands of the body.

People with Sjogren’s syndrome often suffer from other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

People with Sjogren’s syndrome often suffer from other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Nobody is sure precisely what causes these conditions. However, most scientists agree that genetics, hormones, and environmental factors are at play.

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Traditional Sjogren’s Syndrome Treatments (Not CBD)

There is no cure for Sjogren’s syndrome. However, there are treatments to help manage its symptoms, including:

  • Artificial tears
  • Saliva substitutes
  • Emollient creams (to moisturize the skin)
  • Vaginal lubricants
  • Anti-inflammatory medication (for pain)

People can also minimize symptoms by making some lifestyle adjustments. They include:

  • Avoiding dry, smoky or windy environments
  • Wearing sunglasses
  • Reducing reading or screen time
  • Maintaining good oral hygiene
  • Chewing sugar-free gum
  • Attending regular optician and dentist appointments
  • Avoiding smoking and alcohol

Can CBD Help Sjogren’s Syndrome?

There is currently no research on CBD oil for Sjogren’s syndrome.

Some studies, such as this 2009 review for Future Medicinal Chemistry, suggest that it could help autoimmune disorders in general. It might be especially beneficial for conditions with an inflammatory component, such as arthritis.

CBD influences the production of a number of inflammatory modulators to produce anti-inflammatory effects. It can, therefore, help to relieve pain and may even slow disease progression.

However, when it comes to using CBD for Sjogren’s syndrome, things become a little more complicated. This is due to the primary Sjogren’s syndrome symptoms of dry mouth and eyes.

Can CBD Oil Help Dry Mouth?

Many people know that cannabis can cause dry mouth as a side effect. But what about CBD?

Unfortunately for anyone wishing to try CBD for Sjogren’s syndrome, the cannabinoid seems to have similar effects. Although many people use CBD without any adverse reactions, a small number of people do experience side effects. One of the most common issues is dry mouth. Let’s take a look at why.

Experts believe that CBD works in several different ways, including increasing levels of a chemical called anandamide.

Anandamide is an endocannabinoid and has a range of vital functions in the body. It binds with cell receptors known as CB1 and CB2 to trigger a variety of physiological responses. These receptors exist throughout the body’s tissues, including the salivary glands.

A 2006 study for Experimental Biology and Medicine tested anandamide’s effects on the salivary glands of rats. It found that injecting the compound directly into the rats’ submandibular glands reduced their saliva production.

It is unclear whether people with Sjogren’s syndrome would see similar results, as clinical research is lacking. However, these initial results suggest that CBD is more likely to cause a dry mouth than relieve it.

Is CBD Good for Dry Eyes?

Although it is less common, there are also reports of CBD causing dry eyes. However, there is sparse clinical evidence relating to CBD and dry eyes in Sjogren’s syndrome.

The journal Neurochemical Research featured an interesting piece of research in 2018. It suggested that CBD increases levels of two neurotransmitters, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine. Both of these chemicals play a role in tear production.

However, the study focused more on the other effects of these neurotransmitters, such as how they influence wakefulness. It also involved rats rather than humans. Therefore, it is difficult to conclude whether CBD would relieve or aggravate Sjogren’s syndrome-related dry eyes.

It is possible that another component of the cannabis plant could help to relieve dry eyes, though. Hemp seed oil doesn’t contain CBD or any other cannabinoids. However, it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which might help lubricate the eyes when taken as a supplement.

A 2013 study for the International Journal of Ophthalmology investigated. It tested the effects of omega-3 supplementation vs. placebo on patients with dry eye symptoms.

It found that, at the 3-month assessment, 65% of symptomatic participants in the omega-3 group experienced relief. The remaining 35% saw moderate improvements. In the placebo group, these figures were 33% and 67%, respectively.

Although the evidence did not apply to Sjogren’s syndrome, specifically, omega-3 fatty acids have many other benefits for health. They are also unlikely to cause dry mouth and eyes, as they do not influence anandamide.

Therefore, it may be that hemp seed oil is more appropriate than CBD for people with Sjogren’s syndrome.

Final Thoughts on CBD Oil for Sjogren’s Syndrome

There is not enough evidence to claim that CBD oil can help Sjogren’s syndrome. In fact, it could make symptoms like dry eyes and mouth worse.

Hemp seed oil may be more suitable as it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which appear to benefit dry eyes. However, research is minimal, and whether it translates to patients with Sjogren’s syndrome remains to be seen.

Anyone wishing to try CBD for Sjogren’s syndrome, or any condition, should discuss their options with a knowledgeable physician first.