CBD Oil For Seborrheic Dermatitis

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My itchy, irritated, flaky, over-treated skin has calmed down so much since using Therapeutic CBD Skin Balm. It really works wonder for seborrheic dermatit The Science-based Facts About CBD Effects on the Skin: Data From the Library of Medicine CBD products have exploded onto the marketplace as a result of the farm bill that legalized hemp agriculture. Both oral and topical products are now being widely sold in states that allow CBD sales. Accompanying the hundreds of pro

Seborrheic dermatitis and CBD oil

Marusa has been struggling with seborrheic dermatitis ever since she was a teenager. She recently sent us this message.

My experience in a nutshell: a bit over a year ago, seborrheic dermatitis started presenting itself on my scalp. My scalp was unbearably itchy and got greasy really fast and in certain areas, patches of what seemed like hardened greasy dandruff formed. I also started losing more hair in those areas. I almost gave up on searching for the best natural products that could help this condition, until I came across hemp shampoo. After about three months of using this product, the itchiness disappeared almost completely, and my hair only starts getting greasy after about 3 days. The hardened dandruff patches are shrinking, and dandruff itself is not as greasy and is removed much easier. I wholeheartedly recommend the shampoo to anyone dealing with similar issues.”

– Marusa

Seborrheic dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a relatively common and chronic inflammatory skin disease that mostly affects the skin of the face and scalp. It can also present itself in other areas of the body, typically in places with the highest concentration of sebaceous glands. It most commonly presents itself as scaly skin on and next to the scalp (the scales can be yellow, white or grey in colour) or red and oily skin that is prone to peeling, is itchy and irritated. Its main cause is an increased secretion of tallow from the sebaceous glands.

Common Causes

The exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis in not known, but it can usually be contributed to a combination of different factors.

  • A genetically conditioned tendency to an increased secretion of tallow from the sebaceous glands
  • An increased presence of the Malassezia fungus that reproduces on oily skin and causes micro-inflammation
  • Stress and fatigue
  • Hormonal changes
  • Poor nutrition and alcohol
  • An impaired immune system

Symptoms – How to recognize seborrheic dermatitis

  • In infants, seborrheic dermatitis is another term for a condition known to young mothers as cradle cap, a skin problem that can clear up by itself within a few months
  • In adults it usually presents itself as scaly skin on the scalp and surrounding areas, but can also manifest behind the ears and in skin folds (elbows, knees, under the breast area)
  • Itchy, red, oily and irritated skin can also be caused by seborrheic dermatitis

Treatment and relieving the symptoms

Seborrheic dermatitis can clear up spontaneously and without any treatment. However, it is often a chronic issue that manifests itself in intervals of outbreaks and remissions. Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that can, to a certain extent, be controlled with the correct approach.

A few suggestions on how outbreaks of seborrheic dermatitis can be relieved naturally:

  • Avoid fatty and processed foods and enjoy foods that are rich in antioxidants
  • In winter maintain a constant level of moisture in the air, using humidifiers to do so indoors
  • Avoid stress and try relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, and regular physical activity
  • Spend as much time as possible outdoors, in the fresh air and sun (with adequate protection)
  • Make sure to get plenty of sleep

How does CBD oil help relieve problems with seborrheic dermatitis?

Seborrheic dermatitis occurs as a result of excessive secretion of tallow from the sebaceous glands and because of excessive reproduction of skin cells caused by the fungus Malassezia. Clinical studies have shown that the CBD molecule reduces the secretion of tallow from the sebaceous glands and inhibits the rapid reproduction of sebocytes, cells that make up the sebaceous glands.

Natural care of affected areas

Choosing the right shampoo
Regular scalp hygiene is important in controlling seborrheic dermatitis and it should not contain aggressive shampoos and soaps, as their use may worsen the condition further. Here we will refer to Marusa’s message about how using Hemptouch Gentle Hydrolate Shampoo almost completely relieved her outbreaks of seborrheic dermatitis. This shampoo is a natural product that doesn’t contain foaming agents, irritants, SLS or silicones. The shampoo is also rich in omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids and contains oils of bergamot, muscat sage, blue chamomile and soothing hemp hydrolate. Finding a product that will not disturb the balance of your natural microflora is key when choosing a shampoo, as it is essential in the fight against Malassezia fungi.

This ultra-gentle hemp shampoo has a delicate cleansing base of plant origin that soothes the scalp, invigorates and balances. Daily care for all hair types. Also suitable for children. Has a soothing effect on sensitive, irritated, oily and scaly scalps. A soap-free cleanser that doesn’t disturb the skin’s natural balance. Ingredients:Hemp Hydrolate has calming and cleansing properties. Hemp seed oil omegas 3, 6 & 9 support moisture balance and help maintain the optimum pH of delicate skin. Clary sage, chamomile & bergamot soothe itching, calm irritated skin and strengthen the hair.

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Applying CBD balm directly to seborrheic dermatitis affected body regions
Therapeutic CBD Skin Balm is rich in CBD oil and is based on shea and mango butter. The balm targets areas of the skin where excessive secretion of tallow and rapid cell division occurs. There are no limitations to how much of the ointment you can apply, as it is a completely natural product.

Concentrated CBD treatment balm tackles the toughest symptoms of atopic skin, alleviates skin reactions and soothes eczema flare-ups. Reach for it when skin needs fast-acting help for inflamed, reddened and itchy conditions. It provides intense relief and unique nourishing care. Ingredients:High concentration of CBD extract is a powerful anti-inflammatory and skin-soothing properties. Hemp seed oil, rich in essential fatty acids omega 3 & 6, Vitamin E and minerals – the building blocks of healthy skin. Calendula, shea and mango butter soothe and nurture.

Something that actually helps .
“At last, I’ve found something that actually helps .
Great texture, lovely smell, absorbs easily and really helps the irritated and flaky atopic skin on my arms hands and face.
Can not recommend it enough.” – Denis

Consuming CBD oil
CBD oil is becoming increasingly popular in combating various types of skin and other health issues. Since CBD oil is primarily intended for consumption (placing a few drops under the tongue is the most effective application), they can affect the entire body “from within” and help strengthen the immune system, which is extremely important in seborrheic dermatitis.

Our Choice for Most Effective Psoriasis treatment:

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Therapeutic CBD Skin Balm

Relieves, protects and revitalises acutely irritated skin.

Keeps psoriasis spots under control. . I’m fighting with my psoriasis for about 40 years now. It was CBD oil and skin balm that helped me keep it under control. Many thanks. ” – Robert W.

It really helps the irritated and flaky atopic skin on my arms, hands and face.” – Cheryl

Our Choice for Treatment of Seborrheic Dermatitis:

Award Winning

Gentle Hydrolate Shampoo

Gently cleanses, balances and soothes sensitive scalp and hair.

Reduced itching and flaking significantly after a week or so. Only thing I’ve found that does not irritate my scalp. Will purchase again.” – Michael

Noticed a difference in my scalp health and the shine on my hair. Great product and reasonably priced. Fantastic!” – Mia D.

Our Choice for Clean and Refreshed Complexion:

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My Balance Skin Clarifying Duo

A facial cleansing gel and a balancing face cream.

My itchy, irritated, flaky, over-treated skin has calmed down so much since using this. Great ingredients and wonderful customer service as a bonus. I’m genuinely so happy I found these products!” – Aimée J.

The cleanser easily gets makeup off cleansing the skin to feel refreshed and ready for moisturizer. The moisturizer does an exceptional job at making the skin feel hydrated without being oily. I have also seen my hormonal acne minimized which is a bonus since hormonal acne is from the inside out.” – Nikki E.

What is Actually Known About CBD’s Effects on Skin

CBD products have exploded onto the marketplace as a result of the farm bill that legalized hemp agriculture. Both oral and topical products are now being widely sold in states that allow CBD sales. Accompanying the hundreds of products now on the market are a multitude of therapeutic “claims” that these products can treat a wide variety of medical problems, including pain, arthritis, psoriasis, aging and even cancer. Given all of the claims for benefits of using CBD products, it is important to understand what the real science and clinical evidence is regarding CBD’s effects both orally and topically.

First of all, evidence that cannabinoids occur naturally in the body dates back over 60 years. Since that time, the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) has been studied in depth. The ECS is made up of:

  1. the endocannabinoids (like CBD) that interact with the receptors of the ECS
  2. the main receptors for cannabinoids, CB1 and CB2, which are found in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on skin cells
  3. various specific enzymes that either synthesize cannabinoids or degrade them. The body actually makes its own cannabinoids and these are called endocannabinoids

However, the cannabinoids that have received all the attention lately are the phytocannabinoids that are derived from plants, like cannabis and hemp.

The Take Home Lesson

For those that don’t wish to read the full report below regarding what is really known about CBD effects on the skin when applied topically, the take-home message is:

  • As of April, 2021, there are NO peer-reviewed publications of controlled clinical studies that describe any benefit of CBD to the skin when applied topically. There are three non-controlled “anecdotal” human studies, several mice and rat studies, and many studies of CBD effects on cultured skin cells. So, at present, we simply don’t know if topically applied CBD products provide ANY benefits.

Although there has been a lot of research regarding cannabinoids, the only in depth clinical studies that have been conducted have looked at effects of cannabinoids after either ingesting, inhaling or injecting the cannabinoids. There have been essentially no published controlled clinical studies on the effects of topically applied cannabinoids. This is surprising in light of the numerous claims showing up on the internet about all the wonderful things cannabinoids can do. If one wants to know what “claims” that show up on the internet are true and which are false, the ONLY way to accurately assess truth from fiction is to do your research on the Library of Medicine’s database. Pubmed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed), the Library of Medicine’s online searchable database lists every peer-reviewed scientific publication related to a given subject.

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A search of the Pubmed database using the search words cannabidiol (CBD) turned up over 3000 publications that have appeared over the years, with most dealing with the oral use of CBD to either treat epilepsy (the only FDA approved CBD medicine is Epidiolex) or to reduce pain. Many other published studies have focused on analyzing CBD content in various cannabis extracts. When the term “cannabidiol” was combined with “skin”, only 62 publications were found. Of these 62, there were only THREE clinical studies on the topical effect of cannabinoids on skin, and these were carried out with very small numbers of patients, which does not provide any statistically significant results. As a result these studies are considered “anecdotal” and not controlled studies. A quick summary of all the results of peer reviewed scientific articles on cannabinoids is listed below.

  1. Although there have been a few mice and rat studies on topically applied cannabinoids, there have been only three published reports of clinical studies on the topical use of cannabidiol.
    1. In one study patients with mild to moderate scalp psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis were given a shampoo containing cannabidiol. After 14 days of use, the level of itching and redness had decreased in the patients.
    2. In a second very small study of 16 patients, they were asked to evaluate the effect of a topical cannabidiol lotion on their eczema. After 2 weeks of use, the patients “self-reported” an modest improvement in the severity of their eczema.
    3. In a third small study, patients treated topically with 8% CBD reported having less nerve pain.
    4. NOTE: in addition to the above studies, a non-clinical study with only 3 individuals suffering from a rare skin blistering disease, epidermolysis bullosa, applied a topical CBD oil to their skin and all 3 reported less blistering.
    1. A topical preparation of CBD was shown to reduce inflammation and swelling in the foot of a mouse injected with an irritant.
    2. Rats treated topically with CBD and then exposed to a UVB lamp showed protection of keratinocytes from apoptosis (cell death caused by UV radiation). Whether or not CBD was simply acting as a sunscreen was not determined.
    3. Mice treated on the ears with a tumor promoter to trigger inflammation showed less ear edema (swelling) in the ear treated with CBD.
    4. Changes in the proteome profile of UVB treated fibroblasts.
    1. CBD induces the expression of antioxidant enzyme genes in keratinocytes treated with UVR.
    2. CBD blocks the NF-kB pathway that leads to the activation of inflammatory genes in UVR stimulated keratinocytes.
    3. CBD reduces keratinocyte proliferation, which may be useful for treating psoriasis but may not be good for normal skin turnover.
    4. CBD reduces free radical (ROS) levels in keratinocytes.
    5. CBD is a gene suppressor and can lower keratin levels in keratinocytes
    6. CBD stimulates melanogenesis (pigmentation) in human melanocytes.
    7. Hemp extract protects keratinocytes and fibroblasts from hydrogen peroxide toxicitiy by blocking ROS (free radicals) and by inhibiting the inflammatory mediator, PGE-2.
    8. CBD reduces sebum production in cultured sebocytes, which might be useful for acne.
    9. CBD increases activity of NRF-2 and this leads to increased antioxidant (superoxide dismutase). CBD also prevented cells damaged by UVB from undergoing apoptosis (cell death). Note: the value of keeping potentially mutated cells alive may not be a good thing.
    10. CBD may lower ROS levels.
    11. Flax extract inhibited inflammation but stimulated MMPs in a wound healing model, which may be good for wound healing but bad for maintenance of the dermal matrix.

    As you can see, research on CBD is in its infancy and there is almost NO clinical data showing any beneficial effects of topical CBD on human skin. Given the available data, what effect on the skin might we expect to see if we applied CBD topically?

    1. CBD and keratinocyte growth: The keratinocytes in our skin are dividing all the time at the basal layer of the epidermis and from there they migrate to the skin’s surface to replace those dead, cornified keratinocytes that make up the stratum corneum. The stratum corneum is a critically important protective barrier that protects us against environmental damage by pathogenic bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, UV radiation and water loss. We know that in a young person, the epidermis “turns over” about every 40-45 days (recent studies suggest that the complete turnover of the epidermis takes longer than the 30 day time period that has been used for years). We also know that this “turnover rate” decreases as you get older, due, in large part, to a reduction in the proliferation rate of keratinocytes at the basal layer of the epidermis (age can cause up to a 50% reduction in keratinocyte mitosis). Thus, fewer keratinocytes migrate to the surface and the skin becomes thinner as we age. An article in the Journal of Dermatological Science (Wilkinson and Williamson (2007), J.Dermatol Sci: 45: 87-92) describes the inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation/growth by cannabinoids. In addition, a more recent research study has shown that cannabidiol, as well as other cannabinoids, inhibit the expression of genes that code for important keratinocyte proteins (Pucci, M. et al (2013); Br.J. Pharmacol. 170: 581-591). These proteins, including Keratin 1 and 10, and involucrin, are important structural components of the epidermis. Since these proteins are critical for the normal development, strength and barrier properties of the stratum corneum, inhibiting their production and lowering their levels in the skin, weakens the skin’s barrier.

    So, although the use of CBD in slowing the proliferation of keratinocytes might be helpful in reducing psoriatic plaques caused by rapidly growing keratinocytes, and might even help treat skin cancer, there is no data at present that its use in normal skin care and “anti-aging” products will provide any benefits. And based on the available data, topical CBD might cause skin thinning and a loss of barrier function.

    1. CBD Effects on Inflammation: At the present time there is no scientifically published human data on any anti-inflammatory effect of topically applied A few studies with cell cultures have shown that CBD can lower the level of the inflammatory mediator, TNF-alpha, in leukocytes, block IL-6 and IL-8 production in human monocytes and macrophages, lower COX-2 (PGE-2) expression in macrophages, and block inflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes (Pellati, F; et al; (2018) Biomed Res. Intl. ID. 1691428). Finally, a recent publication has shown that Flax Fiber (which contains several chemicals, including CBD) might be useful as a wound dressing to accelerate healing. Recently, a derivative of CBD, VCE-004, was found to INHIBIT collagen production in human dermal fibroblasts (Del Rio, C., et al., 2018, Br.J.Pharmacol. 175:3813). For a very recent review on what is known about CBD effects on inflammation see Baswan, S.M et al. (2020) Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology. 13:927-942. So although cell culture studies suggest that CBD may provide anti-inflammatory benefits, at present, there are no clinical studies that demonstrate any anti-aging or anti-inflammatory effects of CBD when applied topically to the skin.
    1. CBD Stimulates Pigmentation A recent study on human melanocytes grown in culture found that CBD can stimulate melanogenesis in these cells by increasing tyrosinase activity and by activating a number of melanogenic specific genes ( Hwang, YS. Et al (2017) Chem. Biol. Interact. 273: 107-114). Given this finding, while topical CBD might be useful as a “tanning stimulator” it may aggravate an existing hyperpigmentation (age spot) condition.
    1. CBD Inhibits Sebum Production One of the potentially beneficial uses of a topical CBD product might be for controlling acne breakouts. A recent publication has shown that CBD can reduce sebum production in human sebocytes (Olah, A et al. (2016), Exp. Dermatol. 25:701-707. While retinoic acid also inhibits sebum production, and improves acne, further research might find that CBD provides the same benefit without the redness, and drying seen with the use of topical retinoic acid.
    1. CBD Reduces Neuropathy Pain. One recent study (Xu, DH. et al. 2019, Curr.Pharm.Biotechnol.) conducted with a small group of patients (29) showed that an 8% topical solution of CBD could reduce pain caused by neuropathy.
    1. CBD Inhibits Growth of Cancer Cells One of the more promising effects of CBD is its ability to slow the growth rate of cancer cells, including breast cancer. The mechanism of action of CBD likely involves an antagonism of one or both of the endocannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. Both of these receptors play a role in tumor progression, with CB2 playing the greater role in stimulating breast cancer growth and tumor aggressiveness. By blocking the activity of these receptors, CBD lower cancer cell prolilferatoin and also causes cancer cell apoptosis (cell death). For an excellent review on CBD and breast cancer, see Kiskova, T. et al. (2019) Intl. J. Molec.Sci. 20: 1673-1694.

    In summary, there is considerable peer-reviewed scientifically credible research that shows positive effects of oral CBD on anxiety, stress, and aggressiveness, and on preventing epileptic seizures. In fact, the only FDA approved CBD drug for epilepsy is Epidiolex, a drug that is effective in reducing the frequency of seizures. In addition, there is growing evidence that CBD may be useful in reducing the growth rates of some cancers.

    Conclusion

    At present there have been only 3 published, very small clinical studies on the effectiveness of topical CBD in treating any skin problem; one on the use of CBD for treating scalp psoriasis/seborrheic dermatitis, one that involved only patient “self- evaluation” on the benefit of topical CBD for eczema, and finally, one small study where patients used a topical CBD lotion to reduce nerve pain. Research on human cells grown in culture suggests that CBD does have some anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, there is currently no published data that topical CBD provides any benefits for normal skin, and no data showing any anti-aging benefits.

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