CBD Oils With Thc In Them

In this guide, we explain all you need to know about CBD oil with THC – including its potential advantages and disadvantages. Cornbread Hemp's full spectrum, organic CBD gummies, tinctures, and topicals feel like cannabis you’d get off a dispensary shelf. Cases of CBD oil users failing drug tests are on the rise. Learn more about why this happens and how to avoid it.

CBD Oil with THC: All You Need to Know

By now, most customers are familiar with the fact that CBD (cannabidiol) is a non-intoxicating compound from the hemp plant. It also exists in lower quantities in marijuana, a cousin of hemp, which contains large amounts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Conversely, THC can be found in small amounts in hemp. Most CBD products contain minimal THC, with the federal limit being 0.3% of the item by dry weight. Customers can also purchase CBD isolates, which have no THC whatsoever. The debate rages on as to which type of product is more beneficial. Today’s guide explains the difference between CBD isolates and products that contain THC; read on to find which is best for you.

What You Need to Know About CBD Oil With THC

CBD and THC are both cannabinoids, which means they’re both active compounds from the Cannabis sativa plant species. While THC is abundant in marijuana, CBD is abundant in some strains of hemp. Despite both being cannabinoids, these compounds have many differences. Interestingly, they have the exact same molecular structure: 21 carbon atoms, 2 oxygen atoms, and 30 hydrogen atoms. However, the atoms are arranged differently, and this explains why the two end up being so different. Both compounds can interact with the body’s endocannabinoid system, and yet they trigger very different effects. It has led to some drastic differences in how the government regulates these two cannabinoids. While hemp-derived CBD is permitted in most parts of the country, THC remains federally banned. Some states allow it for recreational use, but others see it as an illicit substance. A significant difference, therefore, is that CBD is commonplace while THC is essentially outlawed.

What Effects They Cause

The effects of CBD and THC are one of the significant variations between the two. THC can attach to the endocannabinoid receptors and overstimulate them, leading to the intoxicating symptoms known as a ‘high’. People often use THC recreationally because of these effects. The high can involve the distortion of time, relaxed feelings, an elevation in mood, and sedative effects. Side effects of THC include red eyes, dry mouth, and, in more severe cases, paranoia. CBD, meanwhile, does not directly bind to cannabinoid receptors at all. Instead, it seems to impact endocannabinoid activity, inducing an array of effects. Interestingly, CBD does not generate an intoxicating high. You may have seen claims that CBD is non-psychoactive, but this is not the case as it can impact the brain. Instead, it is non-intoxicating. With this in mind, it’s vital to note that the meager amounts of THC found in online CBD products are not enough to provoke a high.

Should You Be Using CBD That Has THC In It?

  • CBD isolate: A product that contains nothing but CBD. Most isolates contain 99% pure CBD, with no other cannabinoids. Isolates contain no THC whatsoever.
  • Broad-spectrum: These products contain a “broad” spectrum of cannabinoids. Typically, this means that the item packs various cannabinoids like CBD, CBN, CBV, and more, but that the manufacturer removed all of the THC.
  • Full-spectrum: This is the fullest product, containing all cannabinoids from the hemp plant. No filtering takes place, so there may be THC in the final product. However, as per current guidelines, it must still contain less than 0.3% THC.

How Do CBD Products with THC Affect You?

Most consumers opt for products that contain more than CBD alone. Whether you choose broad-spectrum or full-spectrum is up to you. Products that contain THC – i.e., full-spectrum products – allow the user to benefit from the full array of cannabinoids from hemp. Some consider it a more natural option because it involves no filtration in the production process. As a result, you get to experience everything that the hemp plant has to offer. Brands use their own strains of hemp and produce their own blends, so it’s impossible to say how full-spectrum products will take effect. In general, users can expect to feel the results that come along with several different cannabinoids. Notably, the amount of THC is too small to have a noticeable effect. As a result, you will not experience a high from full-spectrum CBD. That being said, there is a possibility to experience some of the potential advantages of THC.

What About CBD Products with No THC?

Both broad-spectrum products and isolates contain no THC. Again, it’s not possible to determine how any one product will affect you. The significant benefit to using THC-free products is peace of mind since broad-spectrum CBD can still provide you with the effects of a range of cannabinoids. It’s vital to shop around to find a product that works for you since even different consumption methods can provide varying effects. Users take CBD for a variety of reasons, but the products don’t typically cause glaringly noticeable effects. Instead, similar to vitamins, the point is to introduce a healthy compound into your daily routine. CBD products ­– broad-spectrum or otherwise – can provide an opportunity to stay on top of your health and wellbeing. While you will not notice a sudden difference, you can use CBD as an overall daily supplement.

Finding the Right CBD Product for You

Every CBD user is unique, and so they require different products. All CBD products have distinct advantages and disadvantages. As with our PureKana vegan gummies, the primary benefit of isolates is that you know exactly what you are putting in your body. They contain CBD alone, so you don’t have to think about how any other cannabinoids will affect you. Meanwhile, broad-spectrum products carry one of the same benefits of isolates: no THC. If you are wary of taking THC for whatever reason, it could be ideal to choose a THC-free product. Additionally, those who undergo frequent drug tests at work can use a broad-spectrum product to minimize the risk of a false positive. On the flip side of the coin are full-spectrum products. A lot of the PureKana range, including our tinctures, contain a full spectrum of active cannabinoids. These are excellent products to use if you’re seeking an effective hemp supplement since you get to ingest everything that the hemp plant has to offer.

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The Bottom Line On CBD Oil With THC

At the end of the day, there is no correct answer as to which is better. Here at PureKana, we firmly believe in full-spectrum CBD products. We believe that our products provide users with a range of cannabinoids that can diversify their intake, covering a broader scope of effects. That said, we also offer CBD isolate products because we understand that some users prefer to avoid THC and unknown cannabinoids. Using an isolate can be just as beneficial for some users; it’s a matter of personal preference. In short, CBD oil with THC can be advantageous, and it won’t get you high. However, CBD isolates are simply a preference for some users. It’s a matter of doing what works for you and your body. Whatever product you go with, make sure you opt for a reputable brand that offers lab reports and descriptive information on its products.

Real THC is a must in true full spectrum CBD oil

Cannabis just feels different when it’s grown with love and care, especially when it’s cultivated by farmers with knowledge of the plant that runs deep. Consumers in THC-friendly states can identify an artisan crop fairly easily, but with CBD from hemp, it’s more difficult to find quality products in a sea of corporate CBD companies trying to make a buck. And now with laboratory-synthesized cannabinoids on the rise, it’s getting even harder to find the good stuff.

Kentucky-based hemp brand Cornbread Hemp is refreshingly straightforward: all-natural, full spectrum products made from locally grown, organic hemp flowers, just like you’d expect from a premium THC brand. It even includes up to 0.3 percent naturally occurring THC, the most allowed under the 2018 Farm Bill, not lab-grown cannabinoids like delta-8 and THC-O. It’s just as wholesome as homemade cornbread, with up to 2mg of THC per serving.

Kentucky-based hemp brand Cornbread Hemp is refreshingly straightforward: all-natural, full spectrum products made from locally grown, organic hemp flowers, just like you’d expect from a premium THC brand.

The brand’s full spectrum, USDA-certified organic CBD gummies, tinctures, capsules, and topicals feel like cannabis you’d get off a dispensary shelf, and that’s by design.

Cornbread Hemp was founded by former journalist Jim Higdon and his cousin Eric Zipperle, both fierce advocates for cannabis legalization. The pair don’t see hemp and traditional cannabis as separate, they simply cultivate cannabis that fits within the guidelines of federal law.

Other CBD brands either downplay their THC content, use the absence of THC as a selling point, or stuff their products with lab-derived THC like delta-8 or THC-O. Cornbread stands out as being not a CBD brand, but a cannabis brand—and by only including the natural cannabinoids from Kentucky-grown hemp flowers, with no stems, leaves, stalks, or funny business.

Here’s what journalists from Food & Wine, BuzzFeed, and Health Magazine are all raving about.

Cornbread Hemp co-founders Jim Higdon (left) and Eric Zipperle (right) surveying their field of USDA organic hemp. Courtesy of Cornbread Hemp.

Kentucky’s hemp heritage

The first Kentucky hemp crop was planted in 1775, nearly 250 years ago, and for more than a century, the state was the top hemp producer in the United States. Following the “Hemp for Victory” effort during World War II, Kentucky’s booming hemp industry suddenly went dark, except for some farmers that would not go quietly.

Cornbread Hemp’s name comes from the subject of co-founder Higdon’s first nonfiction book, The Cornbread Mafia. It tells the tale of the country’s largest domestic cannabis syndicate, which was, of course, based in Kentucky. The Bluegrass State always goes big with cannabis. The Cornbread Mafia began its massive cannabis cultivation operations in the early 1970s, just as the federal government classified cannabis as a Schedule I drug, and they continued through the 1980s until a wave of more than 70 arrests on 30 farms in 10 states with 200 tons of cannabis in the late 80’s finally shut them down.

Kentucky was just one of a handful of states to create hemp production pilot programs when the 2014 Farm Bill opened the door—and with the 2018 Farm Bill fully legalizing hemp cultivation, hemp was once again part of the state’s booming agriculture industry.

Cornbread Hemp ties this local heritage together, growing high-quality crops on the 37th parallel, the same latitude line that runs through the Hindu Kush mountains. While writing his book, Higdon learned the ins and outs of the cannabis industry—and about Kentucky’s unique climate that makes it the best place to grow hemp. His cousin Eric Zipperle knew good products and the ins and outs of running a good business, making them the perfect match.

Together, they set out to make not just better hemp, but a whole industry that they could be proud of—and their commitment to cannabis has elevated them to thought leaders in the industry. They’re frequently turned to as experts in the field in publications like Bloomberg News, New York Daily News, and POLITICO.

The complete family of Cornbread Hemp organic full spectrum CBD+THC products includes gummies, oils, topicals, capsules, and pet oil. Courtesy of Cornbread Hemp.

Flower-Only ™ and full spectrum for better cannabis

When someone picks up cannabis flower from a THC dispensary, typically they’re getting buds, not shake, and certainly not stems. Those in states without a legal THC cannabis market deserve the same quality, but they’re usually not getting it. High-quality CBD oil lives in the buds, but to save time and money, many producers just process the entire plant all at once and pass off the low-quality products to their customers. Cornbread Hemp gets their CBD oil straight from the source by taking the time to properly harvest their plants—which really should be the bare minimum that a hemp farmer does—for the Flower Only ™ difference.

Some hemp producers cut corners by only using CBD isolates, which lack the subtle compounds that work together to create more robust effects. The rich oil that Cornbread Hemp gets is truly full spectrum, with not just CBD, but minor cannabinoids, terpenes, flavonoids, and, yes, real delta-9 THC. Every single one of these elements makes the others work better, and CBD can’t be its best self without THC.

Unfortunately, it’s increasingly difficult to find CBD products that contain naturally occurring THC—many CBD brands that advertise THC in their products are using lab-synthesized alternates like delta-8. Cornbread’s THC was grown on an organic farm along with the rest of the plant, not concocted in a lab.

CBD-dominant hemp can be just as life-changing as THC-dominant cannabis, so why should hemp consumers get shortchanged?

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Flower-Only ™ CBD products for everyone

Cornbread Hemp’s gummies are USDA certified organic, vegan-friendly, and flavored with organic blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries. Courtesy of Cornbread Hemp.

By sticking to the power of the flower itself, Cornbread Hemp crafts convenient products that can ship nationwide, so even those still under cannabis prohibition can feel the difference of true full spectrum cannabis—and with a wide variety of safe, convenient consumables.

Cornbread can be an upgrade to most CBD products you already have. Each and every product comes from a single USDA-certified organic hemp farm in Kentucky, and a single hybrid strain of federally legal cannabis, otherwise known as hemp. And as Cornbread Hemp proves every day—hemp is cannabis.

Full Spectrum Organic Berry CBD Gummies: For stressful days or sleepless nights, these could be your new go-to full spectrum gummy. Made with certified organic hemp flower extract, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and sugarcane, Cornbread Hemp’s gummies are vegan, gluten-free, and are made without high-fructose corn syrup or artificial flavors. Whether you’re a first-timer or a connoisseur, they have 300 milligram and 1500 milligram 30-count varieties available, which include up to 50 milligrams of CBD and 2 milligrams of THC per gummy.

Whole Flower CBD Oil: Cornbread Hemp’s Whole Flower CBD oil is like yoga in a bottle. That’s because Cornbread only uses hemp flowers, not the whole plant. Using certified organic sugarcane ethanol, they carefully obtain every bit of naturally occurring terpenes, flavonoids, and cannabinoids, then they blend the extract with certified organic coconut MCT oil. No flavors, sweeteners, or preservatives. With up to 50 milligrams of CBD and 2 milligrams of THC per serving, it’s the perfect cannabis oil for evening use.

Distilled CBD Oil: This tincture, designed for daytime use, is lighter on the THC without sacrificing full spectrum quality. Instead of blending the first pass cannabis extract, Cornbread lightly distills this extract just a bit longer. This creates a final product that’s smooth, refined, and works great for daytime comfort and focus.

Full Spectrum CBD Capsules: Perhaps the most convenient cannabis delivery method, these full spectrum capsules are Cornbread’s hidden gem. That’s because they contain higher levels of CBDa than any other product in their selection, which works great for exercise-induced inflammation and other forms of physical discomfort. If you’re an athlete, these are for you.

Organic CBD Balm: Designed for sore muscles and joints, this balm stick adds the power of cannabis to organic arnica and peppermint for soothing, targeted relief. If you’ve never used a CBD+THC topical to support your body, like after a long hike or working all day on your feet, you’re seriously missing out.

Cornbread Hemp’s field of hemp flowers at sunrise, just before harvest. Courtesy of Cornbread Hemp.

CBD Lotions: Available with or without menthol, Cornbread’s lotions contain their signature hemp flower extract blended with botanicals like organic peppermint, eucalyptus, and rosemary. These lotions smell and feel great, without the greasy residue of other salves and balms. For hands and feet that need quick, soothing support, the CBD Lotion + Menthol is your new best friend. And for irritated skin that needs a boost, the CBD Lotion Skin Formula is for you!

CBD Oil for Pets: We dare you to find another pet CBD product that’s (vegan) corn dog flavored. We also dare you to find one that contains 17 milligrams of CBD and 1 milligram of THC per serving, which is why Cornbread’s products for pets actually work. One full dropper is formulated for an 80-pound dog, and the dosage for smaller pets can be easily measured using the marked dropper. If you’ve got a furry friend in need of comfort, whether cat or dog, this product has your name on it. Made with distilled hemp flower extract, this is perfect for picky pets that turn their noses up at other CBD products.

To find these products and even more of the good stuff from Cornbread Hemp, hit the link below.

Will CBD Oil Result in a Positive Drug Test?

Sherry Christiansen is a medical writer with a healthcare background. She has worked in the hospital setting and collaborated on Alzheimer’s research.

Verywell Health articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and healthcare professionals. These medical reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more.

Femi Aremu, PharmD, is a professional pharmacist with experience in clinical and community pharmacy. He currently practices in Chicago, Illinois.

CBD (cannabidiol) oil is a popular product for everything from pain control and anxiety to promoting sleep. However, with the rise of CBD use comes a concern about failing a drug test.

News stories are emerging across the country involving famous people who have gotten positive drug screening results for the presence of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This is the component of marijuana that can cause people to feel high. This is happening even though CBD oil is said to be THC-free.

What are the odds that CBD oil users will test positive when subjected to illicit drug screenings? And what can be done to prevent it?

This article explains why a positive drug test can happen with CBD use, which types of CBD are most likely to trigger one, and what you can do to avoid it.

Does CBD Oil Contain THC?

The active chemical in marijuana that gets detected in a positive drug test screening is THC. Most people are under the impression that CBD oil is THC-free, which is generally true. But not always.

As it turns out, depending on the source of the cannabis that is used to produce the CBD oil, some products do contain traces of THC. This includes low-quality isolates and many full-spectrum tinctures. A full spectrum oil contains other active plant compounds in addition to the CBD.

Cannabis Types

Cannabis is the umbrella term describing hemp and marijuana plants—two different varieties of the Cannabis genus. Both marijuana and hemp can be described as cannabis, but they are two different plants.

CBD is one of many active chemical compounds in cannabis plants. One reason it’s becoming more popular is because it’s said to lack THC.

The primary difference between hemp and marijuana is that hemp is nearly void of THC. In fact, a cannabis strain must contain less than 0.3% THC to be classified as hemp. This is why hemp can be legally sold in various products.

Most CBD products are made from hemp, not marijuana.

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There are many distinctions between marijuana and hemp that relate to CBD oil. Marijuana contains both THC (the “high”-inducing element) and CBD. Hemp contains CBD and only trace amounts of THC.

Hemp also contains many cannabinoids, which is a name for the compounds found in cannabis. CBD is only one example.

There are several techniques for extracting CBD oil from the cannabis plant. The extraction method determines whether the CBD oil is an “isolate” or a “full-spectrum oil.”

A CBD isolate is a pure compound with no other active compounds or cannabinoids. The full-spectrum compounds may include other active chemicals, such as cannabinol and cannabis terpenes (the part of the plant that gives the plant its aroma).

Study of CBD Oil

While some CBD oils claim to be isolates, they may be full-spectrum oils and actually contain more cannabinoids (such as THC) than they claim.

A study conducted at the internationally known Lautenberg Center For Immunology and Cancer found that CBD was more effective at treating inflammation and pain when used with other cannabis plant compounds.

These compounds were derived from a full-spectrum product rather than a CBD isolate product alone. This is one reason that full-spectrum products (those containing THC) are popular.

However, the distinction between full-spectrum oils and isolates makes all the difference if you are being tested for drug use.

Reasons for Failing a CBD Drug Test

There are several common reasons a person fails a CBD drug test.

Using Product With THC

The most common reason for a failed CBD drug test is that a person is using a CBD oil product that contains THC. This may be a full-spectrum product. Sometimes, though, it could be a low-quality isolate product that contains a small amount of THC.

Although most manufacturers claim their products do not contain THC, this is not always the case.

Cross-Contamination of THC

Very small amounts of THC present in the material that CBD is extracted from can get into the CBD oil in high enough amounts to result in a positive drug test. This scenario may be more likely to occur when CBD oil is purchased from cannabis dispensaries in places where cannabis is legal.

Mislabeling of Products

CBD oil extracted from hemp is not supposed to contain more than 0.3% THC. However, it’s not uncommon for sellers to mislabel their products as THC-free hemp when, in reality, it’s a low-quality oil extracted from marijuana. And marijuana does contain THC.

In fact, one study discovered that almost 70% of the CBD products sold online were mislabeled. This caused “potential serious harm to its consumers.” The reason for this widespread mislabeling is that CBD products are not strictly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Secondhand Exposure to THC

Inadvertent exposure to marijuana (via secondhand smoke) is unlikely to be enough for a person to get a positive drug test result. But it is possible. Being in a room with heavy pot smokers for several hours may cause the inhalation of enough THC-containing smoke to result in a positive test result.

A more likely secondhand exposure scenario is a positive marijuana hair test. This results from direct contact with marijuana paraphernalia or from another person having THC on their hands.

For instance, say that someone who had direct contact with marijuana then touched your hair. You could feasibly receive a false positive on a drug screening that tests your hair.

CBD Oil Breakdown in the Digestive System

Some sources report that in rare cases, false positive test results have come from CBD oil that breaks down into very small amounts of THC in the stomach. Other studies, however, have refuted this finding.

The conclusion is that it’s still theoretically possible for traces of THC to be present in stomach acid when “less-purified CBD productions” are ingested.

How to Avoid a Positive CBD Drug Test

If you take CBD oil, you can take steps to try to prevent failing a drug test:

  • Do thorough research to ensure the CBD product you’re using is pure and that the company is legitimate.
  • Look for manufacturers that have been accredited by the Better Business Bureau.
  • Ensure that the CBD oil is an isolate product extracted from a viable industrial hemp supply. It should not be a low-quality tincture.
  • Ask questions about product processing techniques and the possibility of cross-contamination.
  • Avoid secondhand exposure to marijuana use via pot smoking or hair contact from THC users.

Summary

CBD oil is usually marketed as THC-free, but that’s not always the case. Full-spectrum CBD oils contain other cannabinoids, which may include THC. Isolate products may be contaminated with THC, as well.

You have to be proactive to avoid failing a drug test if you’re taking CBD oil. Most important: Ensure that you’re using a pure product made by a reputable company.

A Word From Verywell

In theory, getting a false positive on a drug test from CBD oil should be relatively impossible from pure CBD oil containing less than 0.3% THC. However, because CBD oil is not well regulated, there is no guarantee that a product contains pure CBD oil, or that its concentration is safe or effective.

Use the utmost caution and do your research when purchasing a quality CBD oil product to ensure its purity, especially if you need to undergo a drug screening.

Frequently Asked Questions

Drug tests look for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the element in marijuana that causes a high. CBD oils can have trace amounts of THC even if they’re labeled “THC-free.” The FDA does not regulate these products, and mislabeling is common.

Yes. If the products contain THC, you could test positive. If you know you’ll need to take a drug test, avoid full-spectrum CBD products that may contain small amounts of THC. Be sure you purchase products from a reliable source. And be wary of online retailers; researchers have found that 21% of online CBD and hemp products were mislabeled.

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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Nahler G, Grotenhermen F, Zuardi AW, Crippa JAS. A conversion of oral cannabidiol to Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol seems not to occur in humans. Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2017;2(1):81-86. doi:10.1089/can.2017.0009

Bonn-Miller MO, Loflin MJE, Thomas BF, Marcu JP, Hyke T, Vandrey R. Labeling accuracy of cannabidiol extracts sold online. JAMA. 2017;318(17):1708. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.11909

Crippa JA, Guimarães FS, Campos AC, Zuardi AW. Translational investigation of the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol (CBD): Toward a new age. Front Immunol. 2018;9:2009. Published 2018 Sep 21. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2018.02009