How much cbd oil for muscle spasms

CBD Dosage: What’s the Right Dose of CBD for Pain Relief?

Take a look at the label on any over-the-counter pain reliever and you can easily figure out how much you’re supposed to take for your symptoms. Finding the right dose of cannabidiol (CBD) for pain relief, however, isn’t that simple.

Enthusiasts rave about CBD’s potential to ease pain, reduce inflammation, relieve anxiety and promote sleep. However, there’s no conclusive research about just how much CBD a person needs to take in order to experience benefits.

There are very few human studies on CBD, and those that have been done include doses that are all over the map: In some studies, patients used 5 mg of CBD; in others, they took as much as 600 mg. To further add to the confusion, CBD comes in a number of forms — oils and tinctures, creams and lotions, pills, vaping, and edibles — and each one has differences in terms of bioavailability (the percent of active ingredient that gets into your bloodstream).

“There are no standard doses for patients,” says Rachna Patel, DO, a physician who does consultations about medical marijuana and CBD and sells her own line of CBD products. “Ultimately, it’s trial and error, but you have to go about it in a methodical way.”

Here are some tips to guide you on how to find the right CBD dosage for your pain relief and other symptoms.

1. Work with an expert

Many factors, such as your body mass index (BMI), specific health condition(s) you have, medications you take, your health history, and the form of CBD you plan to use can influence how much CBD you may need to treat your symptoms. Although CBD is different than medical marijuana — which contains CBD as well as THC, an intoxicating ingredient — a doctor who’s well-versed in cannabis (marijuana) is probably the best person to help you help you sort it out.

“I wouldn’t recommend starting CBD without the supervision of a physician,” says Dr. Patel, author of The CBD Solution. “Many times people purchase a CBD product, try a dose that that doesn’t work for them, switch products and spin their wheels. Or, worse, they develop side effects.”

Ask your rheumatologist or primary care provider to recommend an expert, or find an expert near you by searching the directory of members of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians or the database maintained by your state’s medical marijuana program (if it has one).

2. Do some math

Let’s say you and your doctor settle on a dose of 30 mg of CBD per day. Now what? The answer depends on which form of CBD you take.

Figuring out how much CBD is in capsules or gummies is simple — just read the supplement facts section on the label. (If it says 10 mg of CBD per capsule, you’d take three capsules to get your 30 mg of CBD a day.)

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Oils and tinctures can be trickier because the packaging often states the amount of CBD in the entire bottle, not in a dropper. This calculator can help you figure out how many drops you need based on the strength of the product.

When it comes to CBD in topical form (creams, lotions, and salves), you’ll probably see the total amount of CBD in the container listed on the label. You’ll then have to divide that total by the number of millimeters in the package to determine how much is in each milliliter. For example, if you have a 50 ml jar of salve that contains 200 mg of CBD, there’s 4 mg per ml. You should then use a metric measuring spoon to scoop out 7.5 ml to get a 30 mg dose of CBD.

3. Expect some trial and error

No two patients respond to CBD in the same way. You and your doctor will probably need to adjust the dose either up or down until you hit the right balance of benefits without side effects. “A lot of it depends on your biochemistry and the way your liver breaks down these chemicals. There’s a wide variety of factors that come into play,” says Dr. Patel.

It can take a little while to get it right, so be patient. Many people do not see a difference in symptoms after one or two doses of CBD. It can take up to eight weeks of regular use to feel an impact, says Bridget Seritt, co-founder of the Canna-Patient Resource Connection, a Colorado-based organization that is working to protect patient rights and end stigma against those who choose cannabis as medicine.

4. If you have side effects, stop or lower the dose

CBD won’t get you high the way that cannabis with THC can, but it may still cause side effects. “The most common side effects are fatigue and lethargy, and in rare cases diarrhea,” says Dr. Patel, who notes that CBD that’s taken topically less commonly causes side effects. Topical CBD is best used to address pain in a single joint, rather than widespread pain, she adds.

No matter which form of CBD you use, pay attention to how you feel. If you notice any negative side effects, stop or lower the dose and consult your doctor.

Considering CBD For Muscle Recovery? Here’s What You Need To Know.

Cannabidiol is having a moment. Though you may not recognize its scientific moniker, you’ve probably seen it referred to by its buzzy nickname: CBD.

CBD is everywhere these days, and in a variety of forms. You can find it in capsules, gummies, tinctures, oils, balms, cocktails, cookies—even coffee sold at small-town bakeries. Its market share in the health and wellness space will likely only continue to grow, with some analysts estimating its value will hit $2 billion by 2022.

CBD has a lot of purported benefits with a lot of anecdotal (and some scientific) evidence to back those claims. Everything from helping cancer patients fight nausea, to acting as a sleep aid for people with insomnia, to reducing seizures in children with a severe form of epilepsy known as Dravet Syndrome.

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While those seem like potentially huge breakthroughs, CBD is also said to help with smaller stuff, like helping you recover faster from workouts thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties. Before you dive into a pool of CBD oil, here’s everything you need to know.

Why are we sore after a workout anyway?

No matter how fit you are, sometimes you just feel it after a workout. Some workouts can leave you sore for days. That’s because, as the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) explains, working out causes microscopic damage to muscle fibers. Those muscles then become inflamed, which triggers the body to respond and repair, causing muscle soreness or stiffness.

Cool. So, what exactly is CBD again?

CBD is one of more than 100 chemical compounds found in cannabis plants, which include both marijuana and industrial hemp. CBD is a close chemical cousin to THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical compound found in marijuana that causes a psychoactive effect (AKA, the stuff that gets you high).

Though CBD is just one atom arrangement away from becoming THC, that microscopic difference is actually huge. No matter how much CBD oil you consume or how much CBD balm you rub on your body, you cannot get high from it. Which means.

I can legally buy CBD?

Yes. In December, President Donald Trump signed a new Farm Bill, which, among other things, legalized the growth, distribution, and sale of industrialized hemp, allowing it to be “cultivated for any use”—including the production and extraction of CBD.

There are a few caveats to the bill, but generally you’re now safe to buy CBD across the United States. Even professional athletes can use CBD, as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) removed it from its prohibited substance list in 2018. So relax, your gold medals are safe.

“Broadly speaking, CBD does decrease inflammation when it’s rubbed on muscles as an ointment or taken orally.”

Can CBD really help fight post-workout inflammation?

“As a personal trainer and someone that works out every day and really pushes myself a lot, I noticed the biggest difference in inflammation and stress after a workout,” Tara Laferrara, a former sprinter and a NASM certified personal trainer, told MensHealth.com about her personal use of CBD.

Laferrara was introduced to CBD via friends in the fitness industry who tried it after cannabis was legalized in Colorado in 2014. Now, she’s a devoted user. (A CBDevotee?) “It basically manages and prevents my joint inflammation, that aching kind of feeling, that I’d get after a heavy lift day,” she says.

Is there scientific proof?

While Laferrara’s anecdotal experience is intriguing, you might remain skeptical. Perhaps the scientific findings will squash some of your CBDoubts.

According to a 2018 review of 132 original studies published in Frontiers in Neurology, CBD can indeed reduce inflammation in the body and help improve pain and mobility in patients with multiple sclerosis. “It is anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiemetic, antipsychotic, and neuroprotective,” the review study’s authors wrote.

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“Broadly speaking, it does decrease inflammation when it’s rubbed on muscles as an ointment or taken orally,” Dr. Perry Solomon, previous chief medical officer and founding member of HelloMD, told MensHealth.com.

However, we can’t conclusively say that CBD will, without question, reduce inflammation—and in turn reduce muscle soreness—after another Eb & Swole workout. The empirical data just isn’t there yet.

But I’m good to start a CBD regimen?

CBD is commonly regarded as safe to use. Even the doctors published in Frontiers in Neurology said: “High doses of up to 1,500 mg per day and chronic use have been repeatedly shown to be well tolerated by humans.” You shouldn’t need that much, though figuring out how much you do need can be tricky, as there is no “standard” dose.

One rule of thumb is 1-6 milligrams of CBD for every 10 pounds of body weight based on pain levels. Another is to start with 5-10mg per day and increase by 5-10mg until you feel relief. This isn’t perfect and requires trial and error, but it’ll help you find a starting point.

As with anything you plan to put into your body, discuss CBD with your doctor first, particularly if you take other medications. They can help you make sure your liver will have enough room to metabolize it all so as not to diminish the effects of either.

How should I use CBD for recovery?

Beyond CBD oils and tinctures, CBD is often sold in infused balms, lotions, capsules, edibles, vape pens, and more. Basically, you just need to decide if you’d like to ingest it or rub it on for relief.

Again, you’re mostly on your own to determine exactly how much CBD you should take to feel its effects. The dosing guidelines above should give you a good jumping-off point, but CBD is a subjective chemical that reacts differently in every body. Once you feel the desired effect, though, you won’t have to up the dose. Which means if you use CBD oil for recovery, you can just fill the pipette to the same spot every time.

To sum it up, if your doctor says it’s OK and you’re game to try CBD instead of popping traditional anti-inflammatories, go for it. Try it for a few weeks while varying the delivery method and dose to find what works best for you. Who knows? By tomorrow, you could be recovering faster from your workout and have one less excuse to skip leg day.

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